Our Story

It started with a simple equation: Art + Entrepreneurship = Empowerment. 

cropped-about-page-blog.jpg

Add a couple business-savvy ladies and a serendipitous grant from Projects for Peace, and you’ve got yourself Uncovered Artistry Boutique. We’re a little shop built on the belief that business fosters empowerment in all its flavors (financial, personal, emotional, et al.).

Uncovered Artistry- New Spring Arrivals

Our little piece of this cyber world sells the creative work of domestic and sexual abuse survivors, individuals who, more than most, benefit from the uplifting effects of art and business. Our roots are planted deep in Midwest soil, yet our reach extends to all those with an Internet connection and a penchant for joyful shopping. Shop the boutique today.

Uncovered Artistry is an online shop selling the handmade art and jewelry of domestic and sexual abuse survivors. We support survivors of domestic violence by encouraging creativity and entrepreneurship, financially supporting survivors, and promoting awareness of abuse. Shop online at www.uncoveredartistry.com. Follow us on Twitter @UncoveredArtist.

Domestic Abuse in the News March 14

Check back for weekly updates and keep yourself educated.

Wear Orange on 2 June to Support Gun Violence Awareness. Visit the National Network to End Domestic Violence’s Facebook page.

wear orange

Immigrant Crime Victims Seeking Special Visas Find a Tough Path. Learn more about the challenges of acquiring a U visa here.

If you know of a news story we’ve left out, please let us know in the comments or send an email to uncoveredartistry@gmail.com.

Uncovered Artistry is an online shop selling the handmade art and jewelry of domestic and sexual abuse survivors. We support survivors of domestic violence by encouraging creativity and entrepreneurship, financially supporting survivors, and promoting awareness of abuse. Shop online at www.uncoveredartistry.com. Follow us on Twitter @UncoveredArtist.

Domestic Abuse in the News March 7

Let’s talk about domestic abuse. To do so in an educated, productive way, it’s best to keep ourselves constantly educated about the topic. Here’s a convenient round up of news topics related to abuse. Check back for weekly updates and keep yourself educated.

International Women’s Day  (IWD) was March 8, and many celebrated the social, economic, political achievements of women. Read about how the National Network to End Domestic Violence is fighting for women’s safety as part of IWD here

iwd-logomain2

This week is the NO MORE Campaign‘s #NOMOREweek. See how the organization is saying “no more” to excuses for domestic abuse. 

NO-MORE_Keshia-Chante-214x300

On March 4, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas broke his 10-year silence to ask a question regarding the rights of those with history of domestic abuse to use guns. Read the full story here.

If you know of a news story we’ve left out, please let us know in the comments or send an email to uncoveredartistry@gmail.com.

Uncovered Artistry is an online shop selling the handmade art and jewelry of domestic and sexual abuse survivors. We support survivors of domestic violence by encouraging creativity and entrepreneurship, financially supporting survivors, and promoting awareness of abuse. Shop online at www.uncoveredartistry.com. Follow us on Twitter @UncoveredArtist.

Domestic Abuse in the News March 1

Let’s talk about domestic abuse. To do so in an educated, productive way, it’s best to keep ourselves constantly educated about the topic. Here’s a convenient round up of news topics related to abuse. Check back for weekly updates and keep yourself educated.

At the 2016 Oscars, Joe Biden introduced Lady Gaga, who sang a powerful song with sexual assault survivors. Watch the video here

Survivors move to change policies that allow states to throw away untested rape kits with the Sexual Assault Survivors Act. Read the article here. Check out Rise, the nonprofit started by Amanda Nguyen.

rise

Kansas shooter had a history of domestic abuse. Read the article here.

To read: The Girl Who Fell is Young Adult novel about a high school senior who is swept off her feet—and into an intense and volatile relationship—by the new boy in school. Read a review here.

the-girl-who-fell-1

If you know of a news story we’ve left out, please let us know in the comments or send an email to uncoveredartistry@gmail.com.

Uncovered Artistry is an online shop selling the handmade art and jewelry of domestic and sexual abuse survivors. We support survivors of domestic violence by encouraging creativity and entrepreneurship, financially supporting survivors, and promoting awareness of abuse. Shop online at www.uncoveredartistry.com. Follow us on Twitter @UncoveredArtist.

We’re On Instagram!

Follow us at Uncoveredartistry! We’ll be posting pics of our beautiful handmade products as well as what inspires and drives us to keep doing what we’re doing.

UA Follow Us on Instagram!

Uncovered Artistry is an online shop selling the handmade art and jewelry of domestic and sexual abuse survivors. We support survivors of domestic violence by encouraging creativity and entrepreneurship, financially supporting survivors, and promoting awareness of abuse. Shop online at www.uncoveredartistry.com. Follow us on Twitter @UncoveredArtist.

Our Vision 2016

Welcome to the new Uncovered Artistry Blog! Angie here, co-founder and social media manager. For those new here, Uncovered Artistry Boutique is an online shop selling the art and handmade jewelry of domestic and sexual abuse survivors.

We got started 5 years ago, while we were both juniors at Lake Forest College, with the help of a grant from Projects for Peace. Today, Sarah lives in New York, where she studies entrepreneurship at the University of Rochester’s Simon Business School MBA program.

Sarah's travels

Pictures of Sarah’s travels around the world. I spent half of 2015 living in Holland, and she came to visit. We saw many amazing places in Europe!

I live in Glasgow, Scotland, where I’m getting my masters degree in creative writing at the University of Glasgow. So, a lot has changed!

Angie Scotland

Me (Angie) in Scotland. That’s Edinburgh’s Arthur’s Seat in the background.

Over the holidays, Sarah and I got together and drafted a plan for 2016. What did we want to accomplish with Uncovered Artistry? How did we want the business to grow? What were our goals?

Sarah and Angie Holiday

A picture of me and Sarah at Christmas. I’m not actually taller than her (credit: heeled boots) — we really are identical twins!

Here’s our vision, who we want to be by the start of 2017:

Uncovered Artistry is an established online boutique, selling a wide selection of home goods and jewelry. We make a large impact on the lives of a select number of artisans by purchasing their work, making sales, and promoting awareness of domestic abuse.

We’re focusing on three areas of improvement:

  • Expanding our selection of products –> Which means buying MORE from our artisans
  • Growing our social media platform –> Which means EXPANDING our reach as we promote awareness

I’m proud to announce our new shiny social media accounts. Browse the shop and follow us on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

Uncovered Artistry is an online shop selling the handmade art and jewelry of domestic and sexual abuse survivors. We support survivors of domestic violence by encouraging creativity and entrepreneurship, financially supporting survivors, and promoting awareness of abuse. Shop online at www.uncoveredartistry.com. Follow us on Twitter @UncoveredArtist.

Empowering Women to Live Free From Violence: Interview with NYAWC

“Empowering women to live free from violence.”

-Empowering women to live free from violence.-

This is the motto of the New York Asian Women’s Center (NYAWC), an organization based in New York city that “helps women and their children overcome domestic violence and other forms of abuse by empowering them to govern their own lives.”

This motto on the NYAWC homepage immediately caught my eye. That word “empowerment” in particular hooks me. Because you don’t often hear the word “empowerment” used in the same breath as “domestic violence.” But empowerment is key; it’s how organizations and shelters like NYAWC, which provides “a safe haven through multi-lingual support programs and shelter services,” help break the cycle of abuse.

As part of January’s Human Trafficking Awareness Month, I had the opportunity to engage in a bit of Q&A with a staff member at NYAWC.

But before I get into the thick of things, let me do a quick plug — Here’s an easy way for readers to get involved and give back to this great organization! NYAWC’s two programs for wellness and for children and youth are in need of art and musical supplies for counseling and group activities. You can support them by visiting NYAWC’s MyRegistry page.

It’s not often we get to learn more about how a non-profit came to be, how it works, and what inspires its staff. Mary Caparas, manager of NYAWC’s anti-human trafficking program, Project Free, gave us an inside look at NYAWC:

Angie: What is your first memory of working with NYAWC?

Mary: My first memory was actually being provided with supervision – and realizing that I had more to say and more to process than I initially thought!

victimization labels (2)

Angie: What has surprised you the most about working with NYAWC?

Mary: I was surprised at the level of collaboration and shared leadership staff continually strived for. It was exciting and re-invigorating.

Angie: What do you find most challenging about promoting awareness for human trafficking? (An author aside here: We all must strive to educate ourselves beyond the many misconceptions of abuse and recognize it as a real issue affecting all kinds of people). 

Mary: I find the topic’s inaccessibility to be the most challenging. Some people focus on images from popular media — and forget about the resilient and capable human beings it affects. As such, some people are either unwilling to discuss or face its root causes or find the entire topic too triggering to bring up.

Angie: What is the best thing to happen to you since you began working with NYAWC?

Mary: The best thing really has been meeting clients as I find that I do learn the most from direct work with them. While I have worked at NYAWC, it has been ingrained in me that exploitation and/or abuse can be part of an ongoing continuum so, although I specifically manage Project Free, NYAWC’s anti-human trafficking program, I also continue to step back and realize that clients may have also experienced more than just trafficking in their lives. It is always very much present in my mind that victimization labels can perpetuate stigmas.

Angie: What do you wish other people knew about HT or about what NYAWC does?

Mary: I wish people knew how much of an open door policy NYAWC had. We might be called the “New York Asian Women’s Center” but we serve anyone who has ever experienced some form of abuse and/or exploitation inclusive of gender, race, or sexual identity. We also serve clients indefinitely. If you also got to know each of the staff and counselors, you would get a sense of how generous and kind they all are and in a city that is always moving and working, such kindness is like breathing wonderfully clear air.

Angie: Tell me about some of the people you’ve met and worked with while working with NYAWC. Who in particular has inspired you?

Mary: Aside from the hard working and generous staff here, the folks who have inspired me really have been the clients and community members. They share their lives with you – their wins, their losses, their laughter, their strategies for survival, their histories. They have told me what we should advocate for especially if they don’t yet have the resources (or energy) to use their own voices. It inspires me to lead a life of service for others.

victimization labels (3)

Angie: What would you tell someone who is looking to get involved for Human Trafficking Awareness Month this January.

Mary: I would say that they should think of one thing (even something small) that can create a great ripple effect. Believing a person when no one else will is something seemingly small and requires no material resources, but it can make a world of difference for a person who keeps having doors shut on them.

Angie: How do you think art and entrepreneurship can help those in difficult situations?

Mary: Having worked with the Deaf community, I learned that art can allow for expression when the voice is not accessible. At our Asian Women’s Empowerment program for possible survivors of human trafficking, I’ve also seen how the arts can create a sense of community and alleviate anxiety. Entrepreneurship gives opportunity for a person to have a vision and utilize one’s skills.

Follow NYAWC on Facebook & Twitter.

Need help now? Call NYAWC’s 24/7 multilingual hotline at 1-888-888-7702 or visit www.nyawc.org for more information.